Cambridge Checkpoint Tests

The boy is new to my class room. But in the years before my colleagues surely have taught him how to get round the problem when an English word just doesn’t pop up. You are to describe it using words you do know.

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Fransje’s Blog

Roaming the blogosphere I came across a jewel. It is a blog by a first former who uses this blog as a portfolio of her work in the art room.

She also comments on works done by professional artists:

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Eeny, meeny, miny, moe

Georgie Porgie. This image, the text of the nursery rhyme and the interesting historical background of this seemingly nonsensical poem are to be found at www.nursery-song.com

Teaching in English is a major challenge for a speaker of English as a second language. Five years ago, when I chose to take part in my school’s tto programme, I knew that I would lose a lot of class management tools by changing from Dutch to English. Most jokes, funny comments, appraisals or admonishments just can’t be translated. To my surprise one favourite tool could be transferred directly into English.

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The Invisible Button

The Invisible Button

The Invisible Button is located just below the emergency button.

Recently I found a nice trick to welcome my students to my CLIL-art room. While standing at the doorway I make them pound the wall next to the entrance. “Do not forget to push The Invisible Button!” I have explained the meaning of this silly ritual to them: “It will remember you to change your mode from Dutch into English.”

In theory no Dutch word should be heard in my classroom. When addressing their teacher my students use English only, as they know that I will not even react to Dutch, if there is no life at stake. When they are communicating amongst each other I frequently catch them out at speaking Dutch though. It is a nuisance, and I lambaste them about it to no avail.

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